Your New Family Member

Keeping Our Pets Healthy and Safe

 

As the saying goes...An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. Pets need regular visits to the Vet to keep them happy and healthy. Many dogs and cats come into our shelter without even thier basic health care needs provided for by their previous owners. Not always is this intentional neglect as much as not knowing and understanding thier pets basic healthcare needs. By providing this information, we hope to have happier pets and their families.

 

 

This information is to be used as a guideline only. Please consult a licensed Veterinarian

 

 

Puppies:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Upon your new puppy's arrival, one of the first things recommended is to make an appointment with the Vet for a basic check up.
  • Most Vets recommend that puppies be vaccinated for distemper, hepatitis, parainfluenza and parvovirus (DHPP combo vaccine). Vaccinations need to given at three week intervals beginning at 8 weeks
  • Rabies vaccinations can be given as early as 12 weeks, but some veterinarians may prefer to wait until the puppy is a little older.
  • All puppies and dogs adopted from our shelter must be spayed or neutered before you can take them home. Spay and neutering is the best defense against unwanted pets. For more information about spay and neutering visit our Why Spay or Neuter page click here.
  • Heartworm prevention can be started at a young age. Ask your Vet what she/he recommends. Most heartworm preventatives also treat internal parasites such as round, whip, tape and hook worms. Heartworm preventive medication should always be given year round.
  • Flea and Tick preventitive medication in most cases can be given to puppies 8 weeks and older make sure to ask your Vet. Fleas and ticks can transmit diseases harmful to both you and your pet such as Lyme Disease, blood parasites and bacterial diseases (transmitted by ticks) and tapeworms(transmitted by fleas). Fleas can also cause flea allergies which can cause skin problems and decrease your pets quality of life.
  • Basic training can start as soon as you get your puppy home. By starting at an early age you are getting a jump up on the puppy's behaviors before he jumps up on you! Remember what ever you allow that cute little puppy to do, she will do when she is full grown and alot bigger. Socialize your puppy to all kinds of different situations so when she grows up she will have the confidence to handle just about anything.
  • Puppy Proof your house and yard. Just like you would child proof your house for dangerous items you must do this for your puppy as well. Puppies will chew. If you dont want that new pair of shoes ruined then put them out of reach. Many puppies and young dogs are brought to the shelter simply because their owners got fed up with their chewing. It's not the puppy's fault, she's only doing what comes natural. Give her plenty of appropriate dog chew toys and remember pick it up unless you want it chewed up!

 

Kittens:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Upon your new kitten's arrival, one of the first things recommended is to make an appointment with the Vet for a basic check up.
  • Kittens require 3 sets of shots to protect against infectious diseases such as Immunedeficientcy Virus(FIV/Aids), Enteritis Respiratory Disease(Cat Flu), Chlamydia and Leukemia(FLV). The first at 6-8 weeks, 10-12 weeks, and 14-16 weeks, then an annual booster.
  • Its common for kittens to have worms passed on from their mothers. Kittens should be wormed from 2 weeks of age, every 2 weeks until they are 12 weeks old, then monthly until they are 6 months old. After this age, they should be wormed every 3 months for life. Flea control is also important for controlling flea tapeworm. Rabies vaccinations can be given as early as 12 weeks, but some veterinarians may prefer to wait until the puppy is a little older.
  • Cats can get heartworm too. Before starting on heartworm prevention medication it is advisable to have your Vet perform a simple test to make sure your cat does not have heartworm.
  • All cats and kittens adopted from our shelter must be spayed or neutered before you take them home. The surgery used to be done at 4-6 months but now some Vets are performing it at an earlier age. It varies from Vet to Vet. Spay and neutering is the best defense against unwanted pets. For more information about spay and neutering visit our Why Spay or Neuter page click here.
  • Litterbox training. Kittens usually start using the litterbox at 3-4 weeks of age. Place the kitten in the box at times that are common for a cat to eliminate (first thing in the morning, after meals, after playing and waking up from a nap).  Make sure to place the litterbox in a quiet area of your home. Much sure you provide the right size box. A tiny kitten isn't able to use a high sided box. Make sure she can get in and out of the box safely and easily.

 

Dogs:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Upon your new dog's arrival, one of the first things recommended is to make an appointment with the Vet for a basic check up.
  • Dogs require an annual visit to the Vet to ensure they stay happy and healthy. Physical exam, fecal exam, heartworm test, and dental exam are recommended yearly. Booster vaccinations have traditionally been given yearly however vaccination protocols are evolving as new research is being done on the length of vaccination protection. Check with your Vet.
  • All puppies and dogs adopted from our shelter must be spayed or neutered before you can take them home. Spay and neutering is the best defense against unwanted pets. For more information about spay and neutering visit our Why Spay or Neuter page click here.
  • Heartworm tests(a simple blood test) should be done yearly. Heartworm is easily preventable. The preventive medication comes in different forms and some also are combined with other ingredients to kill fleas, ticks and internal parasites. Check with your Vet as to what medication is best for your dog. Heartworm preventive medication should always be given year round.
  • Flea and tick prevention is also recommended not only for your dogs health and well being but for yours too. Fleas and ticks can carry diseases that can harm both you and your dog. Your Vet can advise you as to which product to use.

 

Cats:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Upon your new cat's arrival, one of the first things recommended is to make an appointment with the Vet for a basic check up.
  • Cats require an annual visit to the Vet for a physical examination and vaccine boosters. Your Vet can recommend what tests and vaccines should be performed at the time of your visit.
  • Indoor cats live a much longer, healthier and happier life. The average lifespan of an outdoor cat is less then 3 years. Even a so called indoor outdoor cat has a shorter lifespan. In short if you want your cat to be around for a long time keep her indoors.
  • All cats and kittens adopted from our shelter must be spayed or neutered before you can take them home. Spay and neutering is the best defense against unwanted pets. For more information about spay and neutering visit our Why Spay or Neuter page click here.

 

 

In conclusion we want all are adopted animals to have a long and happy life with their new families. Being a responsible pet owner cuts down on the dogs and cats returned to our shelter because of health or behavioral problems. This is just a basic guideline, always make sure to consult a licensed Veterinarian.

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